Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Hey! American Christians! Listen Up!

If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.


I hope no one clicked on "continue reading this post" thinking, "Yeah Lewis! Right on!"


That verse (2nd Chronicles 7:14) is not about you. That verse is not about, nor is it applicable to, America. That verse has nothing whatsoever to do with anything you might do when you close the curtain of your polling booth next year, or in any other future election. 


That verse was a message spoken by God to Solomon, meant specifically for the nation of Israel a few millennia ago. It was not spoken to you. If you read something more into it than a historical perspective of the relationship between God and the nation of Israel, it may be time for you to put down that bible for a spell.


Americans aren't "my people". Some Americans are. Some Mexicans and Canadians are. Some Sri Lankans are. It's kinda naive, not to mention terribly selfish, to think this OT verse is somehow applicable to America (at the expense of those poor Christian schmucks in other countries - I doubt they're Republicans anyway, so they may not even be saved. *SA).


If you think that verse applies to America, to abortion, to gay marriage, to prayer in schools, to keeping those mean ole libruls out of office... you've been duped. You may think spouting that verse, even going so far as to put up signs that say "VOTE THE BIBLE - 2ND CHRONICLES 7:14", makes you a better Christian, a better American, better period. It just makes you look narrow-minded, and makes you look like a sheople.


Don't be duped by emotional rhetoric and fear-mongering. Separate your patriotism from your faith before your patriotism becomes your faith.

12 comments:

  1. So you don't automatically go to heaven when you die defending this great country?!!

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  2. I wish blog posts had "like" buttons. :)

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  3. This was used in a facebook post recently along with a mandate to avoid evil Halloween celebrations, by someone I respect. I'm still giving him the benefit of the doubt, since I think he knows a lot more than I do, but the rhetoric has been there and it's very disappointing.

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  4. Great, now I have another tactic from the Australian Christian Lobby to look forward to.

    Such people always think passages about sin apply to other people, not themselves, don't they?

    Christine

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  5. I've always believed that it was written for me. I am a Christian. I am His. And I bear responsibility for humbling myself, praying, seeking His face, and turning from MY wicked ways, so that He will hear from heaven, forgive MY sin, and heal this land. I believe all Christians bear that responsibility (or should) and that if we took that responsibility more seriously instead of blaming non-believers, our country would be more "healthy." I don't see it as a political issue. God says we should pray for those in authority over us, and that HE places those who are in authority over us. The point is that we need to pray GOD'S will into a situation, not our own. Everyone (even those we don't like or agree with) play a part in God's plan; ultimately we know things will get worse before they get better, and shouldn't be so shocked at what goes on in the world. We may not (or ever) understand how God uses circumstances that seem so "evil" for good, but as Christians, we should have faith that He does and will use it for His glory. The mission of a Christian is to be the best WE can be, especially at following God's edict to love one another, and have faith and trust in HIM. Sorry, didn't mean to write a book... LOL

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  6. I only agree with part of your post. That verse was written to Solomon, and it is....history. But then you could say the same thing about a lot of the Bible. I believe that a good deal of it is still applicable to us, His children.

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  7. The danger with applying this verse to yourself is in slipping into a works-based mentality. "IF I do this, this, and this, THEN God will do this, this, and this."

    This verse was part of an Old Testament covenant between God and an entire nation of people. These people were under Law, and ritual and performance were paramount.

    In Christ, we're no longer in a "If you'll do this, this, and this, I'll do this, this, and this" situation with God.

    We have to be really careful in our applications of verses such as this one.

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  8. I think it's a good picture of God's faithfulness to us, His willingness to always be there for us. But you're right, we shouldn't treat it as though it's making a specific promise to a specific modern situation.

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  9. >>I doubt they're Republicans anyway, so they may not even be saved. *SA).<<

    THAT was funny! I needed a good laugh today. This was a good blog. Thank you! :-)

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  10. Thanks for the follow up, good clarification there, Lewis. Especially with the "good works" mentality that would be so easy to slip into. I hadn't thought about that.
    Although it does go without saying, that if we do turn from wickedness and ask for forgiveness, God will give it.

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  11. Oh I think some people have put patriotism into place of their religion..for sure.

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